Dennis Sheehan Passes Away

TMZ reported that Dennis Sheehan has passed away in his hotel room in LA. Some reports have been floating around by other U2 blog sites that the bands past manager Paul McGuinness was the one that was found die. No Paul has not travel LA and as far as we know he is enjoying retirement just fine.

Dennis Sheehan was found unconscious in his room at the Sunset Marquis Hotel. We're told paramedics were called to Sheehan's hotel room around 5:30 AM for a reported cardiac arrest. He was pronounced dead on the scene.

Just six hours earlier, U2 had finished their sell-out concert at the Forum venue in Los Angeles.

Sheehan, who says on his Twitter profile he “loves travel, food, music, company and chatting,” began working with U2 in 1982 when they were about to release their War album. 33 years later and he, Bono, and the rest of the band have become close friends, as well as colleagues.

U2 has updated their official statement

- "We've lost a family member, we're still taking it in. He wasn't just a legend in the music business, he was a legend in our band. He is irreplaceable." Bono

- "With profound sadness we confirm that Dennis Sheehan, U2's longstanding tour manager and dear friend to us all, has passed away overnight. Our heartfelt sympathy is with his wonderful family." Arthur Fogel


 

U2's Promising Tour Gives Fans More

Kevin Mazur /Wireline/ U2TOURFANS 2105

Kevin Mazur /Wireline/ U2TOURFANS 2105

The iNNOCENCE + eXPERIENCE Tour found U2 operating on a level few popular artists could even begin to aspire to Friday night at US Airways Center, where the sold-out crowd was treated to an elaborate pop-art spectacle that managed to push the theatrical boundaries of a rock show while advancing a social agenda or two with a sense of purpose and conviction.

It played to the back rows (and beyond) as much as any U2 concert. But for every bell and whistle, every grand attempt at making sure you understood that Bono still has something more important to convey than "Hello, Phoenix," Friday's concert also found them operating on a very human scale, letting their hair down in moments that thrived on spontaneity and self-effacing humor.

The look on Bono's face, as played out on a giant screen, when he sat at an upright piano and realized the part he was playing was horribly wrong was priceless. As was his reaction to the overly enthusiastic fan he brought on stage to strum along on acoustic guitar to "In God's Country."

"Ritalin is also good," Bono told him.

he staging spanned the length of US Airways Center, with a large rectangular i-shaped stage at one end of the venue, a smaller e-shaped stage at the other and a catwalk connecting the two, with a massive rectangular video cage suspended from the ceiling. A separate catwalk inside the cage allowed the members of U2 to immerse themselves in imaginative video projections — a visually stunning effect allowing Bono to walk the animated streets of his youth on "Iris (Hold Me Close)," a heartfelt tribute to his mother.

The screen was also used to powerful effect on an impassioned "Sunday Bloody Sunday," during which the faces of the victims of the Bloody Sunday incident in Northern Ireland were projected on the sides of animated houses as Bono poured his heart out on a chorus hook that sadly felt as relevant as ever: "How long must we sing this song?"

And that wasn't the only overtly political moment of the show. During "Pride (in the Name of Love)," a heartfelt tribute to the life and death of Martin Luther King, Jr., Bono said, "This is the moment where we get to talk about peace as an action" as part of a monologue that talked about "the courage to compromise in Ireland" before drawing a parallel between the violence there and the more recent strife in Baltimore and Ferguson.

Kevin Mazur /Wireline/ U2TOURFANS 2105

Kevin Mazur /Wireline/ U2TOURFANS 2105

Setting the tone for their performance with the Patti Smith song "People Have the Power" blaring on the PA, U2 took the stage and launched into a track from last year's "Songs of Innocence" whose title references another CBGB legend, "The Miracle (Of Joey Ramone)." A tribute to that life-affirming moment when you hear "a song that made some sense out of the world," it proved a brilliant introduction to a performance that clearly had making some sense of the world on its list of things to do.

They weren't shy about delving into "Songs of Innocence," playing six of the 11 tracks. But by the second song, they were blowing the dust off their first album, "Boy," with the post-punk urgency of "The Electric Co.," the Edge's guitar mixed gloriously high and Bono, an energetic presence in excellent voice throughout the night, inserting a snippet of "Send in the Clowns."

"Anyone speak Spanish around here?" Bono asked coming out of that one. "'Cause clearly I don't." And with that, he counted off a raucous "Vertigo," swatting the lightbulb that hung from the ceiling just over his head. The rock vibe carried over into "I Will Follow," during which the singer brought an eight-year-old on stage and sang the lyrics at him as his bandmates brought the music to a climax.

The night's first monologue found Bono joking about the way Americans had ruined the word awesome. But "as overused as it is," he said, "it applies" to the "miracle of a landscape that is Arizona." He then informed us that over the course of the next few songs, they were going to try to transport us to where they'd grown up. This set up the show's most visually arresting suite, as "Iris (Take Me Home)" gave way to "Cedarwood Road" and "Song for Someone," all from "Songs of Innocence."

Kevin Mazur/Wireline/ U2TOURFANS 2015

Kevin Mazur/Wireline/ U2TOURFANS 2015

The pacing and staging were flawless as they made their way from there through such obvious highlights as "Sunday Bloody Sunday," "Even Better Than the Real Thing," "Beautiful Day," "Bad" and a majestic, set-closing "With Or Without You."

Bono brought three sisters on stage to dance along to "Mysterious Ways" and "Desire" and had one of them live-stream the action on her cellphone, which was great fun. And they stripped things down to beautiful effect with the Edge on piano as Bono delivered a gorgeous, soulful "Every Breaking Wave" on the little e-shaped stage before the rhythm section — the ever-stylish Adam Clayton and Larry Mullen, Jr. — kicked into the concert's most electrifying rocker, "Bullet the Blue Sky." Bono changed the words on that one to "Jazz man breathes into a saxophone while everyone stares into their cell phone," one of several playful touches that offset the moments that bordered on overly serious.

The encore began with a piped-in speech by Stephen Hawking about how "we must become global citizens" and live together "with tolerance and respect," effectively setting the stage for a powerful "City of Blinding Lights." Then, after a speech about conquering AIDS, Bono delivered a moving rendition of Paul Simon's "Mother and Child Reunion," slowing it down for dramatic effect, before bringing the night to a triumphant close with two songs from "The Joshua Tree," "Where the Streets Have No Name" and "I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For."

It was everything a U2 fan could possibly have hoped for in 2015 and a testament to how much more these veteran rockers have to offer 35 years after "Boy" first suggested a promising future.

U2 Concert Ready with New Sound System, Improved Health For Bono

Bono/ U2TOURFANS

Bono/ U2TOURFANS

May 14th can't get here any faster for some U2 fans. Bono has been on recovery since last falls bike accident. The boys have been in Vancouver working on the new tour.

Its different for sure, with no opening band, we have to wonder what will be the walk in music however lets talk more about what we have learned over the last few days.  The New York Times has had access to the boys over the past week to give us some insight to what we can expect.

The concert will be two sets with an intermission with the first half pretty much as fixed set and the second set to be a bit more flexible with arbitrary selections.

U2 has always been on the cut edge side when it comes to technology not only from a sound prospective, stage and lights too. The band has been working on a new audio system that will suspend the speaker arrays from the ceilings pointing down, this will provide a complete immersive experience across the area floor.

The sound will be intense for everyone with no gaps within the house. Its considered to be uniformly transparent with the volume to be constant.

Now the stage will feature three risers, one "I" shaped one for "innocence" a round one shaped like  lower case "e" for "experience and walkway called the divider stage to signify the "passage from innocence to experience. Designed by Es Devlin. 

Remember the band promised another album while don't worry about the tour interference they the finest mobile recording studio heading out with them.

Bono has been writing songs with a few titles almost ready "Red Flag Day", "Civilization" and "Instrument Flying"  We should expect the next album to be within the moment, which could mean more POP music. 

So how is Bono you ask?  Well within the TIMES report Bono stated that the recovery is going well however  "It feels like I have somebody else's hand," the singer said. He likened the feeling to rigor mortis. "They say that nerves heal about a millimeter a week, so in about 13 months I should know if it's coming back." We should not expect Bono to be playing guitar.

So we are about 14 days out from the start and it sure looks to be another amazing tour. Be sure to download your mobile app today to be apart of the experience.