U2 is a Christian band ?

Every once and awhile we get emails that ask the question is U2 definitely a Christian band or are they definitely not.  Well for sure we would all agree its one or the other.  Christians look at the behavior of the band and question the whole idea that they would be in fact Christians because “they should not act that way” What way? Maybe its time to just let them be a band. A band that is faith in humanity and a “higher power” (We would say God) allows them to share views that all you the listener to decide for yourself.  However, for those of you that will not let go of it here is a repost of an article that will have you re-thinking and once again coming up with the same answer. Maybe or maybe not; either way we have had a life time of music that provides us a foundation to make a difference if we choose do so.

Christians argue whether Bono and U2 are in fact Christian. And I’ll use the 5 stages of grief, a favorite of mine, to put it all together.

Stage 1: Denial

U2 is a Christian band:

Are you kidding me? They love the Lord! Of course they’re Christian! Have you heard the song “Magnificent?” That thing is practically a hymn. Here are some of the lyrics: “I was born, I was born to sing for you. I didn’t have a choice but to lift you up and sing whatever song you wanted me to. I give you back my voice. From the womb my first cry, it was a joyful noise…” That’s like an Irish version of John Newton.

U2 is not a Christian band:

Remember that time Bono swore during that awards ceremony? Was that part of the gospel? I mean it wasn’t even a safe Christian swear, it was one of the real ones. Was that a Bible verse? Does the Message swear? It’s been so long since I read it.

Stage 2: Anger

U2 is a Christian band:

I didn’t want to do this, but I’m afraid you forced my hand. You literally forced my hand. Watch the video of Bono and Bill Hybels, the pastor of one of the biggest churches on

the planet. Then try to tell me he isn’t a Christian. Just try!

U2 is not a Christian band:

Has Bono or Edge or the other guys who have the names we forget, have any of them ever come out and said, “I’m a born again Christian?” Have they? Have they? Until that happens, in that exact way and in those exact words, I don’t even want to have this conversation.

Stage 3: Bargaining

U2 is a Christian band:

Here’s the thing. I don’t know the drummer’s name, so I am more than willing to believe he’s not a Christian. But you’ve got to give me Bono. Come on, you give me Bono and I’ll stop saying “U2 is a Christian band” and will instead just say, “Bono is a Christian.”

U2 is not a Christian band:

OK, I’ve listened to a bunch of their music, I am willing to admit that in some ways they write “Christian music.” Their melodies are very “Christian like.” I’m not sure what that means but I value our friendship so I don’t want to fight over this.

Stage 4: Depression

U2 is a Christian band:

Oh man, what if they’re not? Do I have to throw out all my albums? I’m probably going to buy them again, but should I throw them out in some sort of post retreat guilt-induced panic? I’ll do it, I swear I’ll do it.

U2 is not a Christian band:

Oh man, what if they are a Christian band? I’ve been listening to “I still haven’t found what I’ve been looking for” and those lyrics make a pretty compelling argument. I mean look at this, “You broke the bonds and you loosed the chains, carried the cross of my shame, of my shame, you know I believed it.” Bono literally says, you “carried the cross of my shame,” and he “believed it.” Jeez, am I a jerk for doubting his faith? If one of my friends told me, Christ “carried the cross of my shame” and that he “believed it,” would I doubt him? No, I wouldn’t, so why am I so crazy about Bono’s faith?

Stage 5: Acceptance

U2 is a Christian band:

OK, I still like their music. I’m not getting rid of my music. I don’t care if they’re Christian. I’m going to let that go and focus on other things. Like I don’t know, loving my neighbor.

U2 is not a Christian band:

If Christians cover a U2 song and Christian radio will then play them, that’s good enough for me. I give in. I’m willing to believe that U2 is a Christian band.

Wow, we really took a journey today, didn’t we? From denial to acceptance, a thrill ride of theological significance. And now we’re done. We’re all 100% on the same page.

U2 is definitely a Christian band. Or definitely not. It’s one of those two.

Why is U2 The Greatest Band Ever

Despite being routinely described as one of the world’s most popular bands on and off for close to twenty years, U2’s reception is difficult to assess. Many sources indulge in hyperbolic discussions regarding the “greatest” bands in the world, but what exactly constitutes “greatness” in music, and, in particular, popular music? Album sales? Longevity? Membership in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame? Critical reception? Influence? Originality? How would you define greatness ?

Hiatus ? Could it be True ?

U2 / Bono / U2TOURFANS

Everyone was a buzz, could it be possible that the biggest band in the

world is going on hiatus or could it be that the band has chosen to break apart and “Walk On” The idea that something this great may need to be destroyed in order to grow has been heard all to many times with great bands. Yet, the great bands remain focused on turning out great music.

R.E.M has set the dinner table to finish strong.  For R.E.M ending on top requires strong CD sales, however it has failed to provide the last winner for R.E.M.

The boys have completed the largest tour ever and with some extra months, days, hours added in to recover from a delay with Bono’s injury its easy to hear the rumors that the boys may be at the finish line. Rumors fly like the lyrics of a song. Yet no official word has come from management, label or the boys leaving the fans to wonder aimlessly into the past. It is true that every good band must be a

ble to reinvent their music to the issues and public cry of the day.  If the rumors are true, this was the best summer of music ever.

To say that it is over is far from the truth. Their manager already has told people that would listen to him. Bono has work to be finished and the creative juices have been on over drive for sometime. A bad rumor needs to end with us not supporting the noise any longer.

 

"we should just f*** off"

BRIAN BOYD

Achtung Baby’ was the making of U2. As the album is rereleased after 20 years, alongside a film about the band, Bono and Edge recall the turmoil that surrounded the recording and talk about their future

IT’S WHEN THREE glasses are raised to toast “12-step programmes” that you realise perhaps one too many cocktails has been taken. It’s a bar in Toronto and the caipirinhas were Bono’s idea, with Edge not slow to get his round in. “If we don’t come up with a very good reason to make a new album, we should just f*** off,” says Bono. “Why does anyone need a new U2 album?”

For the first time in their 35-year career the notoriously “faster, stronger, higher” band have put the brakes on and taken a long look in the rear-view mirror. A new film about the band, From the Sky Down , documents how their huge success in the 1980s provoked a bout of self-loathing and almost broke up the band as they struggled to stay true to their vision of a band forged in the white heat of Dublin’s punk/new wave movement.

To mark the 20th-anniversary rerelease of their key Achtung Baby album, U2 had a rush of blood to the head. They decided to open their archives and cede editorial control to the Oscar-winning director Davis Guggenheim to make a film ostensibly about the troubled gestation period of Achtung Baby . The result was something very different.

“Watching From the Sky Down the first time made for painful viewing. I hated it,” says Bono. “U2 never look back. It’s never been what this band is about. Edge will tell you that when we put together our best-of collections he forced me – actually had to physically force me – to listen to them before they went out. I’ve never been interested in what we have done. I’m interested only in what we’re about to do. But I think there comes a time when it actually becomes dysfunctional not to look into the past, and for the Achtung Baby album we made an exception.

“The film is not about us per se. It’s about how bands function – or, in this case, don’t function. But when I saw it first I just saw these four people talking intensely about their music, and, really, does the world need that at this time? Davis didn’t tell us he was going into our past to put a context on what really happened to the band after the success of The Joshua Tree and how bad things were in Berlin when we started to make Achtung Baby . He didn’t tell us because we wouldn’t have agreed. Now that I’ve seen it a few times I realise it is actually about the creative process. Let’s face it, the era of rock music is going to end soon, and if you are interested in rock music and rock bands you’ll be interested in their internal dynamics: what makes a rock band tick, the tribal aspect, the idea of the clan. The irony for me now is that we made Achtung Baby to set fire to our earnestness and now here’s this very earnest film about the making of the album.

“We held back nothing from Davis. We opened up our archives to him and he really had carte blanche. The first time I saw it I was going, ‘Oh no, no, no,’ and I went to him and made a few suggestions as to the changes I wanted. There was no battle of wills. He just didn’t even get into a discussion with me. He didn’t change anything. But I was looking at it, going, ‘Why is this film talking about Cedarwood Road [where he grew up], the Baggot Inn and my grandmother? I thought we were making a film about the Achtung Baby album. What is going on here?’ ”

What is going on in the film is a look at how a band who shared musical DNA with Throbbing Gristle and Cabaret Voltaire ended up sitting at music’s high table alongside Elton John and Dire Straits – but without the AOR table manners. A generation before Nirvana dragged alt-rock into the musical and media mainstream, this punk-theatric band ended up on the cover of Time magazine, in April 1987, as “Rock’s Hottest Ticket” and selling out arenas around the world.

Disgusted with the idea of being rock idols and disillusioned by their stadium-rock billing, they were at breaking point. “We were carrying Catholic guilt around – the sin of success,” says Bono. “We had emerged from playing with The [Virgin] Prunes and hanging around the Project Arts Centre getting mime lessons from Mannix Flynn. And the context here is that the musical scene we came from had this very Maoist music press. There were certain canon laws: thou shalt not go platinum; thou shalt not play in a stadium or an arena; thou shalt not go to America; thou shalt not be careerist. If you even thought about those things you had committed a sin.”

DESPERATE NOT TO turn into a cigarette-lighter-in-the-air stadium-rock band, U2 boarded the last flight to East Berlin just before Germany reunified, in 1990. It was one of the harshest Berlin winters, their recording studio, Hansa, was a former SS ballroom, their hotel was rubbish and they had no songs. “On a scale of one to 10 we were at a nine for breaking up,” says Bono.

For Edge, U2 were over the moment they walked into Hansa – or, at least, Rattle and Hum U2 were over. “It would have been insanity for us to have stayed in Rattle and Hum mode; that was a wonderful, great little aside, but it was never who we really were,” says the guitarist. “Who we really are is all about the future and innovation. We were getting a bit purist and a bit ‘disciplist’ about roots music, but we needed to become disciples of what is coming next. I arrived in Berlin with drum machines and loops, telling everyone what was happening in Manchester,” he says, referring to the Hacienda nightclub and to The Stone Roses and Happy Mondays, among other bands. “I was also big into industrial music, but the producer of the album, Danny Lanois, was going, ‘Okay, this all sounds interesting, but show us where it’s going musically.’ And I couldn’t.”

Things deteriorated rapidly. As Bono has it, while outside they were tearing down the Berlin Wall, U2 were building their own wall inside Hansa. On one side were the so-called traditionalists: Adam, Larry and Lanois; on the other, Bono and Edge were throwing club- culture and dance-rhythm shapes. Bono had always felt aggrieved that whenever a club DJ would play a U2 song, it would empty the dance floor. He wanted to make U2’s music sexy.

“To Danny Lanois, from his perspective, we were kindred spirits to his love of roots music,” says Edge. “He loved the organic feel to our music, the material that was on The Unforgettable Fire and The Joshua Tree . But no one knew how to make the bits of new material we had into U2 songs. The first two weeks were a nightmare. Everything we tried would just nosedive. It got to the stage where we lost trust in each other … and there was a clear dilemma.

“There were options: one was to see whether U2 could absorb new material and make it their own, or whether U2 as a band were inflexible and couldn’t stretch. The other option was to throw out all the material, start again and … extend the line-up or bring in other musicians.”

With the band having to take some very hard decisions about continuing to flail around in the studio or just cancelling everything, a deus ex machina arrived in the shape of the discarded second bridge from a song called Sick Puppy (later renamed Mysterious Ways ). That bridge was shaped into the intro for a new song, One . “As soon as One came into that room it stabilised everything,” says Bono. “Everyone just sort of surrendered after we had that. By surrendering, we got over the hump.”

With a song to anchor the album, they returned to Dublin for Christmas and finished off the album in a rented house in Dalkey, in south Co Dublin.

Released in 1991, and hailed as a triumphant reinvention, Achtung Baby sold more than 20 million copies. It remains their most important album, and the resulting tour, Zoo TV, changed how live rock music would be presented and experienced.

It’s dark outside in Toronto now, and an interview that began in sunshine has gone way over time. There’s just one more thing. It may well be an act of lese-majesty, but here goes: one possible interpretation of the film, Bono, is that, without Edge, you’d still be in the Baggot Inn. “Sure,” he says, nodding.

“That’s a lovely thing to say,” says Edge. “But I don’t think that’s true. It’s symbiotic. I wouldn’t be able to do what I do without Bono, and I think that’s reciprocal. He makes me great. I help him to be great.”

Before they descend into you’re-my-best-friend territory, we slip away. Bono is saying, “Being in U2 is like being in the priesthood. There’s only one way out. And that’s in a coffin.”

ON THE ROAD WITH U2

Memphis Mullen:  One month from tomorrow I leave for the U2 360 tour, a journey that I have been planning for over a year. I am so excited!! For 2 ½ months I will be driving across America to all 16 US shows. Along the way, meeting great people, visiting great places, and recording everything for my book and documentary.

The U2 360 tour will bring me to Denver, Salt Lake City, Seattle, Oakland, Anaheim, Baltimore, Michigan, Miami, Nashville, Chicago, Philadelphia, St. Louis, New Jersey, Minneapolis, and Pittsburgh. In between all of these concerts, I am also going to visit Mount Rushmore, Yellowstone National Park, the Lewis and Clark Trail in Montana, Lana Turner’s birthplace in Idaho, Portland, San Francisco, Palm Springs, Hollywood, Milwaukee, James Dean’s grave in Indiana, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, and the Football Hall of Fame in Canton.

While on the road, I will write daily updates, including pictures and videos, that I will post here on U2TOURFANS and on my blog On the Road with U2. Throughout each day, I will also be posting on Facebook (U2TOURFANS and Deena Dietrich) and Twitter (U2TOURFANS and MemphisMullen).

In addition, I hope to do a live broadcast report from each U2 concert, either before or after the show. I also hope to get video from inside the U2 concerts and live tweet the set lists.

I would also like to have U2 Fan Meet Ups on the night before each U2 concert. There are already pre-concert parties with U2 tribute bands planned in Denver, Seattle, Baltimore, Nashville and possibly East Lansing that I am attending. So if there is enough interest, we would like to organize U2 Fan Meet Ups in Salt Lake City, Oakland, Anaheim, Miami, Chicago, Philadelphia, St. Louis, New Jersey, Minneapolis and Pittsburgh for the nights before the U2 concerts.

Thank you to everyone who is supporting me – both with your kind words and reading my posts. Nobody has been more supportive than U2TOURFANS, without whom none of this would be possible.

I look forward to seeing you this summer ON THE ROAD WITH U2!

 



24 Years Later "The Joshua Tree"

Wednesday marks the 24th anniversary of “The Joshua Tree” Most will agree that in addition to being one of the most culturally significant rock ‘n’ roll albums ever recorded which managed to sell over 25M copies and made U2 ” The Worlds Greatest” Band and the title remains. Greatest does not start with a plan or a road map as to where your heading. You can pick up your own copy here

The Joshua Tree (Deluxe Edition) [Remastered]

Today some would say who cares about U2? They have past their time and that the music may not relate to the masses today. However what does a pre-teen Justin lover really know about the world? U2’s message is clearly directed towards the college crowd to guide them to making a difference in the world. Becoming something more than a pay check collecting person.

The idea that one is no greater than another is not a new concept, what’s different is the idea of main streaming the thoughts of being good to each other and looking for ways to help one another.  24 years later and the message still matters. The only difference today is that we may have to tweet it, or shoot a video to get the message out.

The bio is not provided for the dedicated U2 fan rather the possible new U2 fan. Music moves you beyond your space and time.

The Joshua Tree is the fifth studio album by rock band U2. It was produced by Daniel Lanois and Brian Eno, and was released on 9 March 1987 on Island Records. In contrast to the ambient experimentation of their 1984 release The Unforgettable Fire, U2 aimed for a harder-hitting sound on The Joshua Tree within the limitation of strict song structures. The album is influenced by American and Irish roots music and depicts the band’s love-hate relationship with the United States, with socially- and politically-conscious lyrics embellished with spiritual imagery.

Inspired by American tour experiences, literature, and politics, U2 chose America as a theme for the record. Recording began in January 1986 in Ireland, and to foster a relaxed, creative atmosphere, the group recorded in two houses, in addition to two professional studios. Several events during the sessions helped shape the conscious tone of the album, including the band’s participation in A Conspiracy of Hope tour, the death of roadie Greg Carroll, and lead vocalist Bono’s travels to Central America. Recording was completed in November and additional production continued into January 1987. Throughout the sessions, U2 sought a “cinematic” quality for the record that would evoke a sense of location, in particular, the open spaces of America. They represented this in the sleeve photography depicting them in American desert landscapes.

U2 set to release five different versions

U2 are set to release five different versions of new album 'No Line On The Horizon', with a host of extras including a new film by Anton Corbijn available to fans.

As well as a standard CD and vinyl issue, 'No Line On The Horizon' will be released in three limited editions, reports Billboard.

The digi-pack version offers the full album along with a 36-page booklet, a fold-out poster and a downloadable film by Corbijn, featuring the music of U2.

A magazine version of the album comes with a 60-page soft cover magazine-style book, along with the Corbijn film as a download.

The most excessive of the five releases is the box set, which features a 60-page hardback book, a second poster and a DVD version of Corbijn's film.

If your looking to pre-order, AMAZON is the best place with the fastest shipping

No Line On The Horizon [Box Set] [Limited Edition CD/Poster/Book/DVD